Am I Being Replaced?

Question:

I have been working for my employer now for a little over 2 years as her assistant manager. Recently she hired a new employee and he took over most of my job duties including assistant manager for no reason known to me. I feel like they are trying to get me to quit. The owner told me what my job would be, and when I went to do it, the new assistant manager told me I couldn’t do it anymore and speak the owner and let her tell me what to do. I also believe she is paying him more for doing the same job I was doing. What do I need to do?

Signed,

Unappreciaated


Answer:

Dear Unappreciaated:

Unappreciated: Obviously, you feel undercut. After two years as assistant manager, your employer hired an individual who has taken over much of your job duties and, if I understand you, he has been assigned the assistant manager position. Apparently, you need to meet with your employer. Do you have regular job performance evaluation? If not, or if you have not had one recently, the problems you describe should prompt you to request such a meeting. You need to learn where you stand with your boss. You have a right to express anxiety about not being informed of the changes and wanting clarification regarding your position and duties.

Depending on how that meeting goes, it would be wise to schedule a three-way meeting with the individual recently employed, the employer and you. At this meeting, you should get clarification of your job duties. Get them in writing. This also is a time to clarify to whom you report–who needs to be informed and/or approve the progress and completion of assignments. The attitude you should display is that you want to add value to whatever you do and that you expect to be a respected member of the team. It is understandable if you express your frustration and hurt feelings. However, do not come across as soured and bitter, but as one who wants to work cooperatively in an office in which you are supported and which cheers each other on.

Will you let us know what you learn and how this frustrating situation is resolved? If your employer wants you to leave, she should make that clear and allow you time to hunt for another job. That is the least she should do if you have been with her two years.

Put your faith in assertive communication. Think WEGO.

William Gorden