Coworker Lying To Get My Job

Question to Ask the Workplace  Doctors about reporting a coworker is lying to get a job: My concern is that if they see me as a snitch, it may affect my getting a position in the reorganized company, nobody likes a snitch. But, I don’t want them to think I was covering up something or covering for her.

The company I work for is going through a major reorganization and the layoffs have started. The person trying to get my job has been reassigned to a new manager, but what she does for work will more than likely be eliminated. As of right now I have not been reassigned. When the new managers came in to meet me for an interview, this woman started telling them how wonderful she is and exaggerated (lied) about what she does.

Bottom line is that she was an admin in my old department who answered the phone and typed UPS labels. Nothing to do with what I do. To this day she has not fessed up and told the new managers that she doesn’t have the qualifications or experience to do the job. Training has started for my position with the new managers, and she has been included, acting like she knows what’s going on.

In addition to this, she has not told her new boss that she lacks the technical skills to perform in her new department. She is lying to everyone! My question is: should I just let it go and watch her fall when she can’t do the job or should I make the managers aware of what’s going on? My concern is that if they see me as a snitch, it may affect my getting a position in the reorganized company, nobody likes a snitch. But, I don’t want them to think I was covering up something or covering for her.

Signed, ???

Dear ???:

You are facing an ethical dilemma, and probably it is not the first one you have encountered or will. However in this case you may be posing the snitch vs. cover up unnecessarily. During the training with the individual whom you say has presented herself as capable when she is lacking, her incompetence should become evident or she will pick up the needed know-how.Are you saying that this woman is competing with you for a job and doing so by fabricating or exaggerating her experience? Should this be the case is it not the responsibility of those who will make the reassignment to learn what she can do rather than for you to take on that role unless invited to argue your capability against hers?

Let’s suppose you decide to reveal what this woman lied about her competence, how will you do that and whom will you tell? Will you do so privately behind her back? Will you do so in writing with specifics? Will you hint about what she doesn’t know in the course of your training? Will you confront her in the presence of the new management? Or will you speak to her privately and threaten to tell unless she “fesses up”? I get the impression that there is worry about jobs being eliminated. This is felt by this woman whom you say misrepresents herself and possibly also on your part. It is a time for you both to soak up as much as you can and to put your best foot forward. It is time of finding a fit within the reorganization and possibly shaping new roles.

Please think positively. I can tell that you are sensitive to organizational politics and that poses the possibility of stepping on others as you climb up or are trying to just survive. I don’t think you want to do that.Hopefully this reorganization will be good for you. Working together with hands, head, and heart takes and makes big WEGOS, and that is an interdependent-mindedness that pays off. Please keep me posted. I am interested in what you choose to do or don’t do and how it works out.

William Gorden