Supervisor Intimidated By Regular Employee

Question to Ask the Workplace Doctors about criticism of her boss: I hate going in to my job because of her, but I love working for this company because I know it is good for me. So what do I do? Her newly appointed boss is aware of her downfalls – should I talk to her boss?

My supervisor has been with the company 15 yrs and recently the company has made major changes including replacing the “older” employees with fresh, younger attitudes like mine. Well, my supervisor must be terrified of me because everyone around me can compliment me on things I do or tell me how nice I look, but not her.

I am the only black female in this office. There are 5 offices total. There is a total of 2 black females that work for the company. The other employee works at another office. Anyway, I feel my supervisor is afraid of the changes taking place because for one she is not computer savvy. She was promoted from the “old School” and is not up to par with the “new School”. She finds every way possible to try to correct me on such small things that I just say okay and go on. She is not a good communicator or a decision maker at all.

I hate going in to my job because of her, but I love working for this company because I know it is good for me. So what do I do? Her newly appointed boss is aware of her downfalls – should I talk to her boss? By the way, her boss is 30 yrs old. Anytime someone comes into the office for business my supervisor is always asks “Are you close to retirement”? I can’t wait any longer for that day- I wish it were yesterday. FYI – the other 4 employees in the office have been trained under her so she has total control of them, but not me.

Signed, Still Want To Make A Difference

Dear Still Want To Make A Difference:

Can’t wait for retirement? If you love your job don’t allow any pressure to push you out. You still have a desire to do something that makes a difference, but are disheartened because your boss doesn’t seem to invite or appreciate your value to your company. Right? So you ask should you talk to her boss about her inadequacies? By passing is something I learned long ago is never kept in confidence by a boss’s boss.

My advice is rather to voice your hunger for transforming your work group into a winning team. How do you do that? You think through what it might like to come to work for in such a group. You confer with your boss about wanting to work in such a work environment. You suggest that she schedule meetings each week to engage the staff in answering: What have we accomplished this past week that deserves applause? What didn’t go as well as you would like? And how might we correct that? Are there ways we might make each others’ jobs more effective and easier? Are there any ideas about how we might cut wasted supplies, time, energy?

Get the point? Engaging your boss in making a difference can make changes for the better. If these suggestions ring true with you, think them over for a day and then put them into your own voice. I can’t wait to learn what you do and what works or does not. Making a difference takes a champion and a champion does not settle for just business as usual. Think WEGO.

William Gorden